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April
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ucsdhealthsciences:

Brain Imaging Studies Reveal Neurobiology of Eating Disorders
Current treatments for anorexia and bulimia nervosa, which afflict an estimated 10 to 24 million Americans, are often limited and ineffective. Patients relapse. They become chronically ill. They face a higher risk of dying.
“A major reason contributing to the difficulty in developing new treatments for these disorders is our limited understanding of how brain function may contribute to eating disorder symptoms,” said Walter H. Kaye, MD, professor of psychiatry and director of the Eating Disorder Treatment and Research Program at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.
In recent published papers, Kaye and colleagues report the situation is changing. Advanced brain imaging technologies, supported by grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, are beginning to be used to study and improve eating disorder (ED) treatments. Indeed, with funding from the Global Foundation for Eating Disorders (GFED), a New York City-based group that promotes ED research and improved treatments, the UC San Diego Eating Disorders Center for Treatment and Research has launched a new initiative to create more effective ED therapies based upon brain imaging studies.
“Brain imaging research has allowed for a shift from simply describing a symptom to understanding the cause of a symptom,” said Kaye. “In the case of anorexia nervosa, imaging studies have helped us understand why people avoid eating and food and develop treatments that address the cause of the problem rather than secondary behaviors or symptoms.
“This is an important shift in the world of psychiatry similar to what revolutionized medical care decades ago. Today, if you show up at the doctor’s office with a bad cough, he or she might run diagnostics to determine whether the cough was bacterial or viral in order to administer the appropriate treatment. Similarly, the more we understand the specific causes of eating disorders, the more effective and targeted our treatments can become.”
The UC San Diego program, under the directorship of Kaye, Kerri Boutelle, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics and psychiatry, Leslie Karwoski Anderson, PhD, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and GFED scholars Stephanie Knatz and June Liang, is developing an imaging-based treatment package specifically to address the neurobiology of anorexia nervosa, in which patients obsess about being or becoming overweight. To prevent weight gain or lose weight, people with anorexia nervosa typical may starve themselves or exercise excessively.
Kaye said one neurobiological target of anorexia and other eating disorders is anxiety. Most people get irritable when they do not eat and experience eating as both a reward and pleasant experience, he said. Conversely, anorexic individuals frequently feel extreme anxiety when eating food – or even just anticipating eating – which results in severely reducing their food intake as a means of reducing their feelings of anxiety.
“Recent imaging research has uncovered specific alterations in the brain associated with this link between food and anxiety in anorexic individuals,” said Kaye. “This finding is important because it helps explain the of cause food restriction, the most critical and dangerous behavior in anorexia.”
The UC San Diego researchers have used the new information to create new treatment strategies, including psychoeducation – teaching patients why symptoms occur and how to more effectively cope.
“Many patients have described finally feeling a wave of relief after learning that the anxiety they experience is not their fault, but partly due to how their brain is responding to food,” said Kaye. “Understanding why their eating disorder is driving them to restrict allows them to better target their anxiety around meals. Strategies such as developing routines before meals have shown promise in reducing the anticipatory anxiety leading up to meals and food restriction.”
Kaye said the brain-based therapy also benefits families of patients with eating disorders.
“Through a better understanding of their family member’s eating disorder and its causes, family members have found comfort and hope with a ‘road map’ guiding them through the recovery.”

ucsdhealthsciences:

Brain Imaging Studies Reveal Neurobiology of Eating Disorders

Current treatments for anorexia and bulimia nervosa, which afflict an estimated 10 to 24 million Americans, are often limited and ineffective. Patients relapse. They become chronically ill. They face a higher risk of dying.

“A major reason contributing to the difficulty in developing new treatments for these disorders is our limited understanding of how brain function may contribute to eating disorder symptoms,” said Walter H. Kaye, MD, professor of psychiatry and director of the Eating Disorder Treatment and Research Program at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine.

In recent published papers, Kaye and colleagues report the situation is changing. Advanced brain imaging technologies, supported by grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, are beginning to be used to study and improve eating disorder (ED) treatments. Indeed, with funding from the Global Foundation for Eating Disorders (GFED), a New York City-based group that promotes ED research and improved treatments, the UC San Diego Eating Disorders Center for Treatment and Research has launched a new initiative to create more effective ED therapies based upon brain imaging studies.

“Brain imaging research has allowed for a shift from simply describing a symptom to understanding the cause of a symptom,” said Kaye. “In the case of anorexia nervosa, imaging studies have helped us understand why people avoid eating and food and develop treatments that address the cause of the problem rather than secondary behaviors or symptoms.

“This is an important shift in the world of psychiatry similar to what revolutionized medical care decades ago. Today, if you show up at the doctor’s office with a bad cough, he or she might run diagnostics to determine whether the cough was bacterial or viral in order to administer the appropriate treatment. Similarly, the more we understand the specific causes of eating disorders, the more effective and targeted our treatments can become.”

The UC San Diego program, under the directorship of Kaye, Kerri Boutelle, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics and psychiatry, Leslie Karwoski Anderson, PhD, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and GFED scholars Stephanie Knatz and June Liang, is developing an imaging-based treatment package specifically to address the neurobiology of anorexia nervosa, in which patients obsess about being or becoming overweight. To prevent weight gain or lose weight, people with anorexia nervosa typical may starve themselves or exercise excessively.

Kaye said one neurobiological target of anorexia and other eating disorders is anxiety. Most people get irritable when they do not eat and experience eating as both a reward and pleasant experience, he said. Conversely, anorexic individuals frequently feel extreme anxiety when eating food – or even just anticipating eating – which results in severely reducing their food intake as a means of reducing their feelings of anxiety.

“Recent imaging research has uncovered specific alterations in the brain associated with this link between food and anxiety in anorexic individuals,” said Kaye. “This finding is important because it helps explain the of cause food restriction, the most critical and dangerous behavior in anorexia.”

The UC San Diego researchers have used the new information to create new treatment strategies, including psychoeducation – teaching patients why symptoms occur and how to more effectively cope.

“Many patients have described finally feeling a wave of relief after learning that the anxiety they experience is not their fault, but partly due to how their brain is responding to food,” said Kaye. “Understanding why their eating disorder is driving them to restrict allows them to better target their anxiety around meals. Strategies such as developing routines before meals have shown promise in reducing the anticipatory anxiety leading up to meals and food restriction.”

Kaye said the brain-based therapy also benefits families of patients with eating disorders.

“Through a better understanding of their family member’s eating disorder and its causes, family members have found comfort and hope with a ‘road map’ guiding them through the recovery.”


This post has 264 notes and tag: # science # Neuroscience # interesting # food # psychology .



March
30
xwidep:

Perspective.

xwidep:

Perspective.

(Source: cineraria, via guiseitsdee)


This post has 627,338 notes and tag: # interesting # perception # psychology # cool # gif .



February
09

cover the middle and you go faster, cover the outside and you go slower. 

ah, perception

cover the middle and you go faster, cover the outside and you go slower. 

ah, perception

(Source: unexplainedcinema, via queersandshit)


This post has 922,660 notes and tag: # psychology # gif # cool # perception # science .



November
20


July
31


May
26


May
08

the-last-secret-garden:

aradicaldamewholikestoplaygames:

mashkwi:

The brain is an asshole. 

Fucking brain.

8|

(via kittensandweedandchicks)


This post has 63,559 notes and tag: # win # funny # amen # love # psychology .



April
18
briansbaked:

too romantic 

:3

briansbaked:

too romantic 

:3

(Source: veganmeth420)


This post has 28 notes and tag: # cute # psychology # neuroscience # Marijuana .



March
23

alchymista:

Forewarning: I have a psych exam next week, and since I’ve been studying, I think I’m going to do a number of psychology/neuroscience posts over the next few days. So far, I plan on doing nootropics, doodling, and face-blindness. Tell me if you want any others!

i did a project once on prosopagnosia! there was a 60 minutes special on it recently! what about flashbulb memories or tip of the tongue phenomenon?


This post has 10 notes and tag: # psychology # fuck yeah # win .



February
25
The myth of the eight-hour sleep.

alchymista:

femininescience:

“In the early 1990s, psychiatrist Thomas Wehr conducted an experiment in which a group of people were plunged into darkness for 14 hours every day for a month.

It took some time for their sleep to regulate but by the fourth week the subjects had settled into a very distinct sleeping pattern. They slept first for four hours, then woke for one or two hours before falling into a second four-hour sleep.

Though sleep scientists were impressed by the study, among the general public the idea that we must sleep for eight consecutive hours persists.

In 2001, historian Roger Ekirch of Virginia Tech published a seminal paper, drawn from 16 years of research, revealing a wealth of historical evidence that humans used to sleep in two distinct chunks.”…

“So the next time you wake up in the middle of the night, think of your pre-industrial ancestors and relax. Lying awake could be good for you.”

This is very interesting. It seems that my sleep schedule is not so dysfunctional after all!!

(Source: BBC)


This post has 31 notes and tag: # psychology # science # interesting # sleep .



December
12
xindha:

In a simple experiment, researchers at the University of Chicago sought to find out whether a rat would release a fellow rat from an unpleasantly restrictive cage if it could. The answer was yes.
The free rat, occasionally hearing distress calls from its compatriot, learned to open the cage and did so with greater efficiency over time. It would release the other animal even if there wasn’t the payoff of a reunion with it. Astonishingly, if given access to a small hoard of chocolate chips, the free rat would usually save at least one treat for the captive — which is a lot to expect of a rat.
The researchers came to the unavoidable conclusion that what they were seeing was empathy — and apparently selfless behavior driven by that mental state.
“A New Model of Empathy: The Rat” by David Brown, Washington Post

xindha:

In a simple experiment, researchers at the University of Chicago sought to find out whether a rat would release a fellow rat from an unpleasantly restrictive cage if it could. The answer was yes.

The free rat, occasionally hearing distress calls from its compatriot, learned to open the cage and did so with greater efficiency over time. It would release the other animal even if there wasn’t the payoff of a reunion with it. Astonishingly, if given access to a small hoard of chocolate chips, the free rat would usually save at least one treat for the captive — which is a lot to expect of a rat.

The researchers came to the unavoidable conclusion that what they were seeing was empathy — and apparently selfless behavior driven by that mental state.

“A New Model of Empathy: The Rat” by David Brown, Washington Post

(via harrythighles)


This post has 90,998 notes and tag: # science # animals # awesome # love # psychology .